Skip to main content

CMS Implementing New Rural Emergency Hospital Provider Type

"Hospital" sign on the front of a hospital building

CMS will implement a new Rural Emergency Hospital provider type on Jan. 1. REHs will be able to provide certain outpatient hospital services including emergency department and observation services. CAHs and small rural acute care hospitals with no more than 50 beds are eligible to enroll as REHs under Medicare if they meet certain criteria.

If you're considering converting a rural hospital or Critical Access Hospital to an REH, you can submit your application. You can also learn more about becoming an REH Medicare provider.

REHs will be paid under the Medicare Outpatient Prospective Payment System payment rates, plus 5.0%. CMS will also include a fixed monthly payment, based on the excess of the total amount paid to all CAHs in 2019 over the estimated total amount that would have been paid to CAHs in 2019 if payment were made for inpatient, outpatient and skilled nursing facility services under the PPS.

In the future, the monthly payment will be based on 2023 data, increased by the hospital market basket percentage.

DataGen analyzed the estimated impact of a hospital’s transition to an REH provider status. For the full analysis or questions about the new provider type, reach out to us.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Alternative payment models: Strategies for success

In this edition of DataGen Insights, we look at how alternative payment model participants can ensure their processes and workflows are optimally set up for success. To help, DataGen listed the top three strategies all providers participating in APMs can employ and created a handy checklist to enable maximum returns and reduce financial risk. Please explore our website to learn more about our  products and services .  Download DataGen Insights today .  We hope you enjoy!

Why it's critical for Primary Care First participants to control and understand leakage

Patients' primary care visits outside of their attributed primary care office, also called “leaked” patient visits, can have unintended consequences for Primary Care First participants. Beginning July 2022, PCF Cohort 1 will face a reduction in population-based payments based on their leakage rate. The payment adjustment will be based on their 2021 claims data and will roll forward quarterly. To calculate your leakage rate, divide the number of qualifying visits and services your attributed beneficiaries have made to care centers outside of your practice (for example, visits to urgent care centers) by the total number of qualifying visits and services your attributed beneficiaries have made. Calculating primary care leakage with claims data alone comes with some unintended challenges. Unfortunately, some circumstances can unfairly and negatively impact a practice’s leakage rate: Nuances classifying care delivered by provider team members: It’s difficult to distinguish

CMMI’s New Enhancing Oncology Model – Deadline Approaching

As the final at-risk period for the Oncology Care Model was closing at the end of June, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation announced its new Enhancing Oncology Model (EOM). EOM aims to improve the coordination of oncology care, drive practice transformation and reduce Medicare fee-for-service spending through episode-based payment.  What is EOM? EOM is a voluntary, five-year model set to begin July 1, 2023. Patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer will trigger six-month episodes of care.  Eligible EOM participants include physician group practices with at least one Medicare-enrolled physician or a non-physician practitioner who furnishes evaluation and management services to Medicare beneficiaries receiving chemotherapy for cancer treatment.  EOM participants are required to implement eight participant redesign activities to drive care transformation in their practice. Examples include the provision of patient navigation, 24/7 access to an appropriate c